Tag Archives: Al Jazeera

Robert Mugabe is gone, but what next for Zimbabwe? – The Stream



After 37 years, Robert Mugabe's tenure as president of Zimbabwe is at an end. The 93-year-old resigned on Tuesday days after the military stepped in and protests against him broke out on the streets. But observers say Zimbabwe is bigger than Mugabe – and his removal from office will not necessarily be a panacea for the nation’s ills. Although he remains a father figure and anti-colonial hero for some Zimbabweans, he’s also accused of political crackdowns and presiding over a sputtering economy beset by hyperinflation, debt and youth unemployment. So what next and what sort of country do people want now? The Stream discusses with a panel of Zimbabweans. Join the conversation:
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Mugabe is gone, but what next? – The Stream



After 37 years, Robert Mugabe's tenure as president of Zimbabwe is at an end. The 93-year-old resigned on Tuesday days after the military stepped in and protests against him broke out on the streets. But observers say Zimbabwe is bigger than Mugabe – and his removal from office will not necessarily be a panacea for the nation’s ills. Although he remains a father figure and anti-colonial hero for some Zimbabweans, he’s also accused of political crackdowns and presiding over a sputtering economy beset by hyperinflation, debt and youth unemployment. So what next and what sort of country do people want now? The Stream discusses with a panel of Zimbabweans. Join the conversation:
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream GOOGLE+: http://google.com/+TheStream
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe

Mugabe is gone. What next? – The Stream



After 37 years, Robert Mugabe's tenure as president of Zimbabwe is at an end. The 93-year-old resigned on Tuesday days after the military stepped in and protests against him broke out on the streets. But observers say Zimbabwe is bigger than Mugabe – and his removal from office will not necessarily be a panacea for the nation’s ills. Although he remains a father figure and anti-colonial hero for some Zimbabweans, he’s also accused of political crackdowns and presiding over a sputtering economy beset by hyperinflation, debt and youth unemployment. So what next and what sort of country do people want now? The Stream discusses with a panel of Zimbabweans. Join the conversation:
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream GOOGLE+: http://google.com/+TheStream
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe

Is the war in Syria really almost over?



Bashar al Assad has flown to Russia for a few hours to meet his major ally Vladimir Putin. The Kremlin said Russia’s President told him that the fight against armed groups is close to finishing. And once it's over, finding a peaceful political settlement will be key. The opposition has long demanded a future Syria without Assad. But he’s survived nearly seven years of war and is likely to remain in charge for the foreseeable future. So, will Assad detractors come to terms with that? Presenter: Laura Kyle Guests: Marwan Kabalan – Director of Policy Analysis, Doha Institute. Pavel Felgenhaeur – Russian foreign policy specialist and newspaper columnist. Ammar Waqqaf – British Syrian Society. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Inside Story – Why is Washington closing the PLO’s office? – Inside story



Over the past 50 years since the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, there have been countless talks, negotiations and UN resolutions.
And the Palestinian Liberation Organization has been at the forefront of peace talks over the years. But now, Donald Trump's administration says it will shut down the PLO's office in Washington D.C. That's in response to Palestinian efforts to raise the issue of Israel's occupation at the International Criminal Court. And if the U.S. goes ahead with its plans, Palestinians say they will end all communication with Washington. But what will this move mean for Trump's Middle East peace plan? Presenter: Laura Kyle Guests: Qais Abdel Karim – Member of the Palestine Liberation Organization, PLO. Hillary Mann Leverett – Former White House National Security and State department Official. Ian Black – Visiting Senior Fellow at the Middle East Centre, London School of Economics. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Mohsen Lihidheb: Garbage artist of Zarzis – My Tunisia (Featured Documentary)



In his own words, Mohsen Lihidheb is "a nobody and everybody at the same time". The former post office worker from Zarzis, Tunisia, used to lead an ordinary life, until he was inspired to do something more meaningful. Having grown up by the sea, Mohsen has been collecting objects he found on the beaches of Zarzis for 23 years – items like bottles, buoys and dolphin bones. He puts them on display at this own small museum, or turns them into art installations. With his artistic arrangements, Mohsen hopes to create awareness about the environment and the refugee crisis. "When I start an installation each piece has its own story," he says. "We can't clean the environment if we don't recognise the existence of waste and our role in producing it. We must manage it." Guinness World Records recognised him for collecting 26,820 items in just six years. Since the refugee crisis took hold in the Mediterranean, Mohsen has encountered a growing number of shoes washed up on the beach. Many of them are on display at his own museum, with some of them dangling from a shelf by their laces. He gives them a spin as he walks past them. "Giving movement to the shoes is my way of giving a little bit of life back to the owners who died at sea," he says. Still, not everybody understands Mohsen's fascination with the rubbish that washes up on the shores of Zarzis. "Many people in Zarzis didn't accept my father's actions. They wondered about what he did," says Mohsen's son Youssef. "In Zarzis … people only do something if they can benefit from it." "I was happy to see him pursuing his hobby, but I was also worried about him. Because if you left him alone, he wouldn't stop," he adds. Mohsen continues his work unabated. "I'm concentrating life and the universe in my small space," he says. "I'm trying to change the perception that each thing has only one identity … And I try to provoke the viewer so he sees and feels things differently." – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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South Korea marks unhappy anniversary of Asia’s financial crisis



When South Korea's economy was facing ruin two decades ago, the government was rescued by the International Monetary Fund in a multi-billion dollar bailout. It has enjoyed an incredible recovery since then and is touted as a success story amongst Asian economies. But many South Koreans still remember giving up their gold in exchange for cash. Al Jazeera's Kathy Novak reports from Seoul. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Air strikes kill dozens in Syria’s besieged Eastern Ghouta



Attacks on a beseiged rebel-held suburb of the Syrian capital intensified over the past week, killing more than 80 civilians. The volunteer rescue group Syria Civil Defence said more than 200 air strikes have hit the Eastern Ghouta region of rural Damascus since last Tuesday. Al Jazeera's Osama Bin Javaid reports from Gaziantep near the Turkey-Syria border. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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UK court hears appeal in Shell Nigeria oil spill case



The outcome of an appeal hearing against a verdict issued earlier this year in Britain is being eagerly awaited in Nigeria. Communities in Rivers State are demanding that energy giant Royal Dutch Shell clean up oil spills and pay the associated costs. But Royal Dutch Shell says the case should be dealt with in Nigeria. Al Jazeera's Ahmed Idris reports from the Ogale region in Rivers State, Nigeria. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Syrian opposition leader resigns ahead of UN peace talks



Riad Hijab, the head of Syria's main opposition bloc, has resigned ahead of a conference scheduled in Saudi Arabia aimed at "unifying" various groups opposing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, and a new round of UN-sponsored peace talks set to take place in Geneva. A former prime minister under Assad who defected following the 2011 uprising, Hijab has been the face of the Saudi-backed High Negotiations Committee (HNC) since December 2015. He announced his decision to step down on Monday, without explaining the reasons for his move. Al Jazeera's Mohammed Jamjoom reports. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Amnesty: Myanmar’s treatment of Rohingya amounts to ‘apartheid’



Myanmar's treatment of its Rohingya Muslims has been likened to apartheid, in a report by Amnesty International. The human rights organisation spent two years investigating the cause of the current Rohingya crisis, which has forced hundreds of thousands of refugees to flee over the border to Bangladesh. European and Asian foreign ministers have discussed the Rohingya crisis, on the sidelines of a summit in Myanmar. Al Jazeera's Scott Heidler reports from Myanmar's largest city, Yangon. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Haitians react to Trump’s decision to end ‘protected’ status



Tens of thousands of Haitian immigrants are facing deportation from the United States. Most were allowed in after the 2010 earthquake, which destroyed much of Haiti. But their status was only temporary, and the Trump administration says conditions on the island have improved enough for residents to go home. Al Jazeera's Andy Gallacher reports from Little Haiti, in Miami. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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‘Crocodile’ Mnangagwa: Zimbabwe’s president in waiting



The man considered most likely to replace Robert Mugabe as Zimbabwe’s next president has reportedly spoken out for the first time since the military takeover. Emmerson Mnangagwa had been a powerful and loyal member of Mugabe's inner circle – serving as justice minister, speaker of parliament and vice president, before he was fired earlier this month. His sacking sparked the current political crisis. Al Jazeera's Andrew Simmons reports on the man nicknamed the “Crocodile”. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Nebraska approves Keystone XL pipeline route despite recent oil spill



US regulators have approved the TransCanada company's plan to route the Keystone XL pipeline through the state of Nebraska. The decision comes despite a recent major spill on the company's existing pipeline. Al Jazeera’s John Hendren reports. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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UK court to issue verdict in Shell Nigeria oil spill case



The verdict of a court case in Britain is being eagerly awaited in Nigeria. Communities in Rivers State are demanding that energy giant Royal Dutch Shell clean up oil spills and pay the associated costs. But Royal Dutch Shell says the case should be dealt with in Nigeria. Al Jazeera’s Ahmed Idris reports from the Ogale region in Rivers State, Nigeria. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Former Wimbledon champion Jana Novotna dies of cancer



Former Wimbledon champion Jana Novotna has died, aged 49, at her home in the Czech Republic following a long battle with cancer. While Novotna became famous for her tears in the 1993 Wimbledon final defeat, she will be remembered as the Wimbledon 1998 champion. Al Jazeera’s Lee Wellings reports. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Uncertainty in Germany as coalition talks fail



Germany may face a new round of elections after talks to form a coalition government collapsed. The three-way coalition talks included Chancellor Angela Merkel's CDU-CSU coalition and the Greens, but they fell apart following the withdrawal of the Free Democratic Party FDP. Merkel said she was 'very sceptical' about moving ahead with a minority government and would rather see new elections. Germany’s President Frank-Walter Steinmeier urged all parties to return to the negotiating table, saying that the responsibility to lead the country still lay with the political parties. His party, the Social Democrats, has refused to take part in a coalition government. Al Jazeera's Jamal Elshayyal reports from Berlin. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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101 East – Bounty Hunters promo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLaBNJmIGyM

With weak law enforcement allowing the Philippines’ most wanted fugitives to evade capture, are bounty hunters the country’s best hope for justice? – Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Trump names North Korea ‘a state sponsor of terror’



The US President Donald Trump has designated North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism; he also promised more US Treasury sanctions against Pyongyang. This was reportedly preceded by months of debate within the Trump administration, as some state department officials argued that North Korea did not fit the legal definition of a state sponsor of terrorism. While Trump promised that there would be new sanctions on Pyongyang, his Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said he did not expect there to be significant new sanctions and that Washington was still committed to a diplomatic solution to the crisis on the Korean Peninsula. Al Jazeera's Shihab Rattansi reports from Washington, DC. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Protests as desperate Yemenis beg the world for help



The International Committee of the Red Cross says the Yemeni cities of Sanaa, the country's capital, and al-Bayda now lack clean water. A shortage of fuel caused by the Saudi-led blockade has caused pumping stations to shut down. Some Yemeni ports have re-opened to allow in desperately needed food and aid, but critics say it’s not enough, as Yemen suffers a humanitarian catastrophe and the worst outbreak of cholera recorded. Al Jazeera's Mohammed Jamjoom reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Qatari FM: Blockade on Qatar destabilising Middle East



Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani, foreign minister of Qatar, held a meeting with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on the last day of his US trip on Monday. Speaking to an audience, Al Thani spoke of the effects that the Saudi-led blockade on Qatar was having on his country as well as on the region. Calling the blockade an 'aggressive power play', he expressed his concern that the region could be heading towards more instability, driven by the irresponsible blockade that had no exit strategy. Al Jazeera's Rosiland Jordan reports from the State Department. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Who is in charge of Zimbabwe? – Inside Story



Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe appears to have ignored a deadline to resign. His ruling Zanu-PF party had told him he must step down – or be impeached. Now it says that process will begin. The party is accusing Mugabe of being responsible for political instability, and an unprecedented economic tailspin. And frustration is turning to anger with hundreds of students out protesting, demanding Mugabe get out of office. So, what's next for Zimbabweans desperate for change. Presenter: Laura Kyle Guests: Bright Matonga, former government spokesman and deputy information minister under Presideny Mugabe. Muna Ndulo, professor of law and constitiional expert at Cornell Law School. Earnest Mudzengi, political commentator and director of the Zimbabwe Media Centre. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Zimbabwe: Mnangagwa to return for talks with Mugabe



President Robert Mugabe seems to have ignored the Monday deadline his party, ZANU-PF, gave him to step down. He has, however, been in contact with former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa, who had left Zimbabwe when he was fired by Mugabe two weeks ago. Commander of Zimbabwe Defence Forces General Constantine Chiwenga says Emmerson Mnangagwa will return soon. Mugabe’s move has not endeared him to his people, whose calls for his resignation are getting louder by the day, with many saying that Mugabe is too old and must retire. The ruling party is moving forward with their efforts to remove the 93-year-old president, intending to file an impeachment motion in parliament on Tuesday. Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports from Harare – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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What makes a good African leader? – The Stream



Mo Ibrahim, the Sudanese-born British billionaire philanthropist made his fame and fortune by bringing mobile phone service to tens of millions of Africans across the continent. Now, he is known for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, and its prize, considered the world’s largest, for good governance and leadership, awarded to departing African leaders that fit criteria established by the foundation. Celtel International was founded in 1998 and went on to be a trailblazer in establishing communications on the African continent. The company is famous for never having paid a bribe, a story Ibrahim is fond of telling. Since he sold Celtel in 2005 for 3.4 billion, he has been focused on his foundation’s work and the annual index of African governance; an index with that measures political, social, and economic factors in all 54 countries. It is an ambitious tool, meant to increase accountability and provide Africans with information to ask questions of their leaders and governments. The foundation’s prize was created as an incentive for African leaders to shun corruption, step down at the mandated time, and to provide departing African leaders with a livelihood after leading. The prize is not without some controversy, as some critics have said it’s akin to bribing a leader simply to do the right thing, or rewarding them just for doing their job. It awards $5 million USD over 10 years when the selected leader steps down, and $200,000 USD thereafter for life. But every year has not seen a laureate awarded. Since it began in 2006, only five individuals have been given the prize, and the prize has not been awarded for the last three years, highlighting the political challenges faced by some African countries. The Stream meets with Ibrahim to discuss African governance, his foundation’s work, and the driving forces in Africa right now. Join the conversation:
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Mo Ibrahim: What makes a good African leader? – The Stream



Mo Ibrahim, the Sudanese-born British billionaire philanthropist made his fame and fortune by bringing mobile phone service to tens of millions of Africans across the continent. Now, he is known for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, and its prize, considered the world’s largest, for good governance and leadership, awarded to departing African leaders that fit criteria established by the foundation. Celtel International was founded in 1998 and went on to be a trailblazer in establishing communications on the African continent. The company is famous for never having paid a bribe, a story Ibrahim is fond of telling. Since he sold Celtel in 2005 for 3.4 billion, he has been focused on his foundation’s work and the annual index of African governance; an index with that measures political, social, and economic factors in all 54 countries. It is an ambitious tool, meant to increase accountability and provide Africans with information to ask questions of their leaders and governments. The foundation’s prize was created as an incentive for African leaders to shun corruption, step down at the mandated time, and to provide departing African leaders with a livelihood after leading. The prize is not without some controversy, as some critics have said it’s akin to bribing a leader simply to do the right thing, or rewarding them just for doing their job. It awards $5 million USD over 10 years when the selected leader steps down, and $200,000 USD thereafter for life. But every year has not seen a laureate awarded. Since it began in 2006, only five individuals have been given the prize, and the prize has not been awarded for the last three years, highlighting the political challenges faced by some African countries. The Stream meets with Ibrahim to discuss African governance, his foundation’s work, and the driving forces in Africa right now. Join the conversation:
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream GOOGLE+: http://google.com/+TheStream
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe

Mo Ibrahim: What makes a good African leader?



Mo Ibrahim, the Sudanese-born British billionaire philanthropist made his fame and fortune by bringing mobile phone service to tens of millions of Africans across the continent. Now, he is known for the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, and its prize, considered the world’s largest, for good governance and leadership, awarded to departing African leaders that fit criteria established by the foundation. Celtel International was founded in 1998 and went on to be a trailblazer in establishing communications on the African continent. The company is famous for never having paid a bribe, a story Ibrahim is fond of telling. Since he sold Celtel in 2005 for 3.4 billion, he has been focused on his foundation’s work and the annual index of African governance; an index with that measures political, social, and economic factors in all 54 countries. It is an ambitious tool, meant to increase accountability and provide Africans with information to ask questions of their leaders and governments. The foundation’s prize was created as an incentive for African leaders to shun corruption, step down at the mandated time, and to provide departing African leaders with a livelihood after leading. The prize is not without some controversy, as some critics have said it’s akin to bribing a leader simply to do the right thing, or rewarding them just for doing their job. It awards $5 million USD over 10 years when the selected leader steps down, and $200,000 USD thereafter for life. But every year has not seen a laureate awarded. Since it began in 2006, only five individuals have been given the prize, and the prize has not been awarded for the last three years, highlighting the political challenges faced by some African countries. The Stream meets with Ibrahim to discuss African governance, his foundation’s work, and the driving forces in Africa right now. Join the conversation:
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/AJStream FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AJStream GOOGLE+: http://google.com/+TheStream
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe

Inside Story – Who is in charge of Zimbabwe?



Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe appears to have ignored a deadline to resign. His ruling Zanu-PF party had told him he must step down – or be impeached. Now it says that process will begin. The party is accusing Mugabe of being responsible for political instability, and an unprecedented economic tailspin. And frustration is turning to anger with hundreds of students out protesting, demanding Mugabe get out of office. So, what's next for Zimbabweans desperate for change. Presenter: Laura Kyle Guests: Bright Matonga, former government spokesman and deputy information minister under Presideny Mugabe. Muna Ndulo, professor of law and constitiional expert at Cornell Law School. Earnest Mudzengi, political commentator and director of the Zimbabwe Media Centre. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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Gazans worried as Rafah crossing to close



A temporary opening of Gaza's Rafah crossing on the border with Palestine and Egypt may be extended by two days. Hundreds have passed into Egypt since the crossing opened on Saturday, but there is frustration among many more who have not yet crossed, many of them students trying to reach universities abroad. Israel and Egypt's blockade of Gaza has meant the crossing has been closed for most of the last decade. Al Jazeera's Malcolm Webb reports from the Palestinian side of the crossing. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
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