Tag Archives: Al Jazeera

What does Armenia’s future look like?



“The movement of the street is against my office. I’m fulfilling your demands,” declared Armenian Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan as he handed in his resignation on Monday. Sargsyan’s announcement ended 11 days of anti-government demonstrations demanding his removal from office. The news of his resignation sparked celebrations across the country and around the world. Sargsyan had been appointed prime minister this month after serving 10 years as the country's president. Critics saw the move as a Putin-style power grab since term limits forced him to step down as president in March. The movement against Sargsyan was mostly built by opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan, who’s now calling for a snap parliamentary election. Pashinyan and others are worried Sargsyan might still try and run things from behind the scenes given his party, the Republican party of Armenia, holds a majority in parliament. So what’s next for Armenia? We discuss the future of the country on this episode of The Stream.
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🇰🇵 What about N Korea’s non-nuclear arsenal? | Al Jazeera English



While much has been made in recent years of Pyongyang's nuclear capabilities, little attention is paid to the country's substantial conventional arsenal. It is mandatory for men to serve between three and five years in the army and there is selective conscription for women. Al Jazeera's James Bays reports from Pyongyang. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇫🇷 🇺🇸 Why is Macron courting Trump? | Al Jazeera English



French President Emmanuel Macron, who visited Washington, DC, for high-level talks, urged the US to move away from nationalism and called on the US to work with France to face global challenges. But he warned the US against shutting out the world, saying it needs to lead the way towards strong multilateralism. Al Jazeera's Natacha Butler reports from Paris on how the French have reacted to his close relationship with US President Donald Trump. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇬🇷 Greeks protest against proposed pension cuts | Al Jazeera English



Greek pensioners are protesting against proposed cuts to their pensions next year. According to the latest figures, a majority of Greek pensioners already live on an average monthly income of $412. That is the lowest average rate since 2008 financial crisis. Al Jazeera's John Psaropoulos reports from Athens. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇺🇸 🇮🇷 Will the US withdraw from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal? | Inside Story



France and the United States have a long history that goes back centuries. From the American revolutionary war to the Statue of Liberty – the two countries have had strong cultural and political ties. French President Emmanuel Macron is hoping to build on that special bond, during his three-day state visit to Washington DC. And Donald Trump has rolled out the red-carpet. But beyond the handshakes, smiles and lavish ceremonies, there are serious policy disagreements including the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, which could threaten to put a strain on the special relationship. Trump says he wants to withdraw from the agreement, while France and other European nations are urging him to stick with the deal. Iran, for its part, says if the US withdraws, it too will likely abandon the agreement. So, can Macron convince Trump to remain in the Iran deal? Presenter: Jane Dutton Guests: Hamed Mousevi – Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tehran University. Hillary Mann Leverett – A former State Department diplomat who negotiated with Iran. Oliver McGee – A former White House Senior Science & Technology Policy Advisor. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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🌌 Light pollution undermining search for other planets | Al Jazeera English



Light pollution is threatening to undermine mankind’s ability to search for life on other planets, even in Chile’s Atacama desert, one of the darkest areas on Earth. Atacama is home to some of the world’s most advanced telescopes, but light pollution there has increased up to 30 percent, compared with a decade ago. Although Chile’s government has introduced standards to significantly reduce street lighting in cities near observatories, cheap white LED lights are increasingly illuminating homes, store signs and billboards, especially in the cities of La Serena and Coquimbo. Al Jazeera's Lucia Newman reports from the Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇾🇪 🇺🇸 Between War and the Ban: A Yemeni-American Story | Fault Lines



As the war in Yemen worsens, more and more people there are trying to flee for safety and in many cases, desperately trying to reunite with family in the United States. But with US President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban now in effect, the path to family reunification has been halted. The US embassy in Yemen has been closed for over three years, forcing Yemeni-Americans to travel to other countries, primarily Djibouti, to apply for visas for their relatives. Their only path to the US is a waiver, included in the third travel ban – but even applicants who seem to meet the criteria are being denied – leaving them stuck in a foreign country. Fault Lines examines how Yemeni Americans have been caught between war and the ban and their lives put on hold, as they wait for a Supreme Court decision that will ultimately decide their families' futures. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇲🇾 Suspects in Palestinian scholar’s killing ‘still in Malaysia’ | Al Jazeera English



Police in Malaysia say they believe two suspects in the killing of a Palestinian academic and member of Hamas are still in the country, but they do not know who they are. Fadi al-Batsh was shot 14 times in the back while heading to a mosque in the city, where he worked as an engineering academic. His body is now at the airport ready to be flown back to Gaza. Al Jazeera's Florence Looi reports from Kuala Lumpur. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇨🇩 DRC’s new opposition leader strives to unite party | Al Jazeera English



Democratic Republic of Congo's main opposition party has held its first public rally in Kinshasa in two years. It was called by new leader Felix Tshisekedi and is seen as an attempt to show his ability to unite a fractured opposition. Elections are scheduled for December, but many fear the country will not see a free and fair ballot. Al Jazeera's Andrew Simmons reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇺🇸 🇨🇳 US carmakers fear losing business in China | Al Jazeera English



Amid deepening trade tension between China and the United States, one of the world's biggest annual car shows has opened in Beijing. The exhibitors include major US auto manufacturers who are concerned the current friction could damage their plans in what is now the world's largest auto market. Al Jazeera's Adrian Brown reports from Beijing. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇳🇵 Thousands of Nepal quake survivors still in makeshift shelters | Al Jazeera English



Thousands of survivors of a massive earthquake in Nepal three years ago are still in makeshift shelters. Almost 800,000 homes were damaged by the quake. Each family qualifies to receive $3000 for rebuilding, but so far only 119,000 families have a permanent home – the rest remain in temporary shelters. They say the government has not lived up to its promise of providing them with permanent homes. Al Jazeera's Subina Shrestha reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇺🇸 Migrant caravan from Central America arrives at US-Mexico border | Al Jazeera English



Dozens of migrants from Central America who have captured the attention and anger of President Donald Trump have begun arriving at the US border with Mexico. They are part of a larger group of migrants seeking asylum in the US, most say they are fleeing violence or persecution in their own countries, including Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The asylum-seekers will eventually turn themselves into US border authorities. But the process for seeking asylum in the US can be long, and has no guarantees. Al Jazeera's Manuel Rapalo reports from Tijuana. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇸🇾 How the media covered the Syria strikes | The Listening Post (Lead)



When footage of an alleged chemical weapons attack was beamed out of Douma, Syria, it set off an outcry and lit the fuse for counterstrikes. The narrative in much of the western mainstream media echoed their own governments': a red line had been crossed, it was a transgression that could not go unpunished. Those demanding evidence that Bashar al-Assad's government was behind the chemical attacks, the sceptics questioning the rush to launch, were given short shrift. The question of waiting for evidence "seems to be missing from much media discussion," points out Tara McCormack, an academic at the University of Leicester. "What we have seen in Syria is footage taken by people on their mobile phones. But there does seem to be a total abandonment of any kind of critical scrutiny. An idea almost that it would be immoral to question these images. I think that's quite a serious failure on the part of a lot of western media." A big part of this geo-political showdown is being fought out over the airwaves, and when it comes to state propaganda, Russia is contributing its share. If only their media could bring the same scrutiny to bear on the Kremlin that they do on the White House. "The main point made in the Russian media was that there was no chemical attack, that there was no need for it and that Russia was being blamed for something it had no role in," explains Marianna Belenkaya, a Russian journalist at Kommersant newspaper. "When the Western media talked about the chemical attack as a fait accompli, the Russian media, not just the state ones, but more liberal, balanced outlets were trying to understand what the reasons for such an attack would be. Our western colleagues don't even want to hear this kind of questioning," she adds. Syria's civil war has claimed half a million lives and displaced millions more, but the United States and its allies have chosen to intervene, publicly, only when the fighting is alleged to have gone chemical. Chemical weapons are politically beyond the pale. Almost 200 countries have signed the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993 which outlawed their production and use. The way allegations of chemical warfare are reported – the way it looks on screen – triggers a response. The footage is horrific, the suffering evident. And once these images turn up in Washington and other western capitals, the politics and the accepted rules of war do the rest. According to Omar al-Ghazzi, professor of media and communications at LSE, "it is not about images specifically, it is about the politicisation of images in relation to political agendas. The attention that chemical warfare gets in relation to Syria has actually less to do with Syria than western European history and European publics. Because suffering by bombings and by barrel bombs arguably can be more damaging and kills more people." Contributors:
Omar al-Ghazzi, professor of media and communications, LSE
Tara McCormack, academic, University of Leicester
Adam Johnson, contributing analyst, FAIR.org Marianna Belenkaya, journalist, Kommersant newspaper More from The Listening Post on: YouTube – http://aje.io/listeningpostYT
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🇵🇸 Palestinians: Stories of resistance | Al Jazeera Selects



A mother protests, a teenager comes of age, and a cameraman records his final moments in the 2014 war – life under occupation in Palestine. How to be a Palestinian Supermum Manal Tamimi has been going to the protests in Nabi Saleh of the occupied West Banks for as long as she can remember. To her, to be a Palestinian parent is to be an activist. It’s impossible to separate the two roles. Taking care of her children often involves protecting them from Israeli soldiers and settlers. 15 in Gaza Shurooq Mousa from Deir El-Balah, a few miles south of Gaza City, is about to turn 15 – and when she does so, her life will change. Her family want her to consider wearing the niqab and if she is going to study something, to study medicine. An insight into the complex negotiations that await Shurooq as she stands on the brink of adulthood. Gaza: The Last Picture A Palestinian cameraman record the 2014 Israeli assault on Shujayea, including the final moments of his own life. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇫🇷 French tycoon detained in Africa ‘corruption’ probe | Al Jazeera English



French anti-corruption police have detained one of France's wealthiest men near Paris. Vincent Bollore is being questioned over allegations one of his companies worked to influence two African elections, in return for lucrative business deals. He denies the claims. Al Jazeera's Barbara Angopa reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇰🇪 Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to pilot world’s first malaria vaccine | Al Jazeera English



Three African countries will soon start rolling out the world's first malaria vaccine. Last year, more than 200 million people around the world were affected by the disease. Most of those cases were reported in Africa. Kenya, Ghana and Malawi will be among the first nations to try out the vaccine. Al Jazeera's Fahmida Miller reports from Kenya's Kisumu county. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇺🇸 US Supreme Court to decide legality of Trump travel ban | Al Jazeera English



The United States Supreme Court will hear arguments on Wednesday to decide if President Donald Trump's latest version of the travel ban is legal. Critics say it unconstitutionally stops Muslims from travelling to the US. But the government says Trump is simply using his legal authority as president to safeguard national security. Al Jazeera's Shihab Rattansi reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇨🇴 Can the Colombia-FARC peace deal hold? | The Stream



Mutual recrimination between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, threatens to derail an historic peace accord. The FARC-Colombia agreement closed a chapter on a wide-ranging 52-year civil conflict that took the lives of at least 220,000 people – 80 per cent of them civilians – and left nearly six million people displaced. But the recent high-profile arrest on drugs trafficking charges of Jesus Santrich, a former FARC member and Congress member-elect who was intimately involved in the peace process, has fuelled Farc's ire. And with FARC failing to add to its ten guaranteed congressional seats in recent legislative elections and the centre-right Democratic Centre party in the ascendancy, the November 2016 peace deal is at a critical juncture. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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🇮🇳 India: Asaram Bapu rape case verdict expected today | Al Jazeera English



Police are on alert in northern India for the end of a controversial trial involving a religious leader. Asaram Bapu denies raping the 16-year-old daughter of two of his followers. Some witnesses have been killed before they were due to testify against him in other cases. Al Jazeera's Paul Chaderjian reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇺🇸 🇫🇷 Macron makes case for new Iran deal after meeting Trump | Al Jazeera English



France has proposed negotiating a new deal with Iran that builds on the 2015 agreement to curb its nuclear programme. President Emmanuel Macron made the pitch to US President Donald Trump, who is threatening to pull out of the deal. Al Jazeera's Kimberly Halkett reports from Washington, where Macron is on a three-day state visit. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇦🇲 Armenian opposition leader calls for renewed protests | Al Jazeera English



Supporters of Armenia's opposition are calling for more protests after planned talks with the ruling party were cancelled. Many want a transitional government and new elections after Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan resigned. But tens of thousands marched for a different cause on Tuesday, to commemorate the mass killing of Armenians during World War One. Al Jazeera's Robin Forestier-Walker reports from Yerevan. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇨🇦 Toronto van attack: Suspect charged with 10 counts of murder | Al Jazeera English



In Toronto, the man accused of killing 10 people by driving a van at pedestrians has appeared in court. Alek Minassian has been charged with 10 counts of murder and 13 of attempted murder. Police are investigating social media posts that may offer clues to his motive. Al Jazeera's Daniel Lak reports from Toronto, Canada. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Can the Colombia-FARC peace deal hold? | The Stream



Mutual recrimination between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, threatens to derail an historic peace accord. The FARC-Colombia agreement closed a chapter on a wide-ranging 52-year civil conflict that took the lives of at least 220,000 people – 80 per cent of them civilians – and left nearly six million people displaced. But the recent high-profile arrest on drugs trafficking charges of Jesus Santrich, a former FARC member and Congress member-elect who was intimately involved in the peace process, has fuelled Farc's ire. And with FARC failing to add to its ten guaranteed congressional seats in recent legislative elections and the centre-right Democratic Centre party in the ascendancy, the November 2016 peace deal is at a critical juncture. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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Can the Colombia-FARC peace deal hold?



Mutual recrimination between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, threatens to derail an historic peace accord. The FARC-Colombia agreement closed a chapter on a wide-ranging 52-year civil conflict that took the lives of at least 220,000 people – 80 per cent of them civilians – and left nearly six million people displaced. But the recent high-profile arrest on drugs trafficking charges of Jesus Santrich, a former FARC member and Congress member-elect who was intimately involved in the peace process, has fuelled Farc's ire. And with FARC failing to add to its ten guaranteed congressional seats in recent legislative elections and the centre-right Democratic Centre party in the ascendancy, the November 2016 peace deal is at a critical juncture. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
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🇰🇵 The road trip from North Korea’s capital to the border | Al Jazeere English



The leaders of North and South Korea are due to hold a summit this Friday. It will be the first direct meeting between the countries' leaders for more than a decade. They are expected to discuss bringing a formal end to hostilities between the two countries. The meeting will take place on the southern side of the truce village of Panmunjom. As a part of an exclusive series from within North Korea, Al Jazeera's James Bays reports on his road trip from Pyongyang to the border. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇾🇪 Are world leaders doing enough to stop the war in Yemen? | Inside Story



Four years of war in Yemen show no sign of relenting – especially from the air. Saudi-led coalition airstrikes have killed at least 45 people in the past week – including wedding party guests, women and children. As in previous attacks which have killed large number of civilians, the Saudis have promised to investigate. And the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has strongly condemned the killings – which have also included the Houthis second in command. Both the Houthis and coalition leaders are being urged to negotiate peace. What more can the international community do? Presenter: Jane Dutton Guests: Hussain AL Bukhaiti a pro-houthi journalist Nabeel Khoury a Former U.S. diplomat & deputy chief of mission in Yemen for the State Department. Noha Aboueldahab a visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
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🇱🇧 Lebanese basketball and politics



After the end of Lebanon's civil war, basketball grew in popularity, and from the mid-1990s to 2004, two clubs, Al Riyadi and Al Hekmeh, fought out an unsporting sectarian battle – attracting enormous support and achieving unprecedented playing success. Media and advertising mogul Antoine Choueiri, known as the grandfather of Lebanese basketball, created the basketball franchise in Lebanon as a way of trying to raise morale in a country coming out of war. "He [Antoine] had a keen sense for how to create a product and he saw sport as an opportunity. The Lebanese love sports. They love new things … so he turned to basketball and a club called Al Hekmeh. The reasons could be territorial or sectarian. He turned Al Hekmeh into an icon," says Pierre Kakhia, president of the Lebanese Basketball Federation. Al Hekmeh was supported by Christian fans, while Al Riyadi was supported by the Muslim community. Their rivalry was almost on a par with El Clasico in Spanish football or Rangers and Celtic in Scotland. "Every time the two clubs played, Lebanon was in a state of emergency," says Kakhia. "People would stay at home. It was difficult to get to nearby areas." At one point, Al Hekmeh fans waved crosses at Al Riyadi fans holding the Quran. Player violence broke out and the fans joined in all-out fights on the court and in the stands. According to Walid Domiati, Al Riyadi's captain at the time, "both Al Hekmeh and Al Riyadi had two symbols, two star players, Elie and Walid. People supported one or the other so the teams promoted the image of their respective stars." "During games, fans cursed star players of the opposing team. So we became competitors … Al Riyadi fans read the Quran during games. Al Hekmeh fans brought crucifixes. We became sectarian symbols. We can't deny this. Al Riyadi was Muslim. Al Hekmeh was Christian," says Domiati. Elie Mchantaf, the former Al Hekmeh captain, says that "politics definitely played a big role. We had a specific role to play. Christian leaders, like Samir Geagea, were in prison and General Aoun was in exile. So Al Hekmeh became an outlet and source of hope for Christians. The club and I had a specific role to play." Watch the full documentary here: https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/aljazeeraworld/2018/04/time-lebanon-golden-age-basketball-180402074420358.html More from Al Jazeera World on: YouTube – http://aje.io/aljazeeraworldYT
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🇧🇩 Bangladesh factories still unsafe five years after 1,100 killed in collapse | Al Jazeera English



Rights groups say thousands of factories in Bangladesh are still unsafe, five years after its worst industrial disaster. More than 1,100 people, mostly female garment workers, were crushed to death in the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse. Al Jazeera's Charles Stratford reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇦🇫 Deadly attacks on Afghan voting centres diminish hope for change | Al Jazeere English



Dozens of people have been killed in Afghanistan over the past week as the Islamic State of Iraq (ISIL, also known as ISIS) group and the Taliban try to derail upcoming elections. At least 60 people died in an ISIL suicide-bombing at a voter registration centre in Kabul on Sunday. In Badghis province, six army officers protecting a registration centre were killed by the Taliban and another centre was burned down on Monday night. The attacks have further dampened hopes for a brighter future and an end to the country's prolonged devastating conflict. Al Jazeera's Charlotte Bellis reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

🇳🇮 Nicaragua protesters demand an end to ‘government repression’ | Al Jazeere English



Anti-government protesters in Nicaragua are refusing to back down, even though President Daniel Ortega scrapped controversial pension reforms. The proposed social security overhaul sparked days of violent protests, leaving at least 26 people dead. Demonstrators are now calling for peace and for an end to what they say is "government repression". Al Jazeera's John Holman reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish – Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera – Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/